Category Archives: Fundamentalist Christianity

Where is the Evangelical Council to the President These Days????

Where is the Evangelical Council to the President?  We used to hear from them, or about them, quite frequently.  But they have suddenly gone strangely silent.  I’ve googled for wisdom and support of Trump from luminaries like Jerry Falwell, Jr., Franklin Graham, and Robert Jeffress and cannot find even a peep from them.  What’s up?

I strongly suspect they realize they have dug themselves into a deep pit, a veritable black hole, and cannot escape without humbly admitting, “We made a mistake.”  But they have bitten of the same poison pill that Trump swallowed early in his life and cannot humbly admit, “I was wrong.”  For they have a tremendous ego investment in their persona as a “Purveyor of the Truth of Jesus,” but are not able to realize they can be that and simultaneously be egregiously full of an ego that demands aggrandizement just as much as does Trump.  AND, I speak from experience, as I started out on a path of seeking a similarly specious identity but was miraculously rescued by the Grace of God which leaves me now but a mere “small clod of cholesterol in the mainstream of life.”  And, I’m humbly “proud” of this lowly station. It takes all the pressure off.

I must emphasize that these men…and women…do as I do, echo the words of the Psalmist, “My soul followeth hard after Thee, O Lord.”  And I do not doubt their sincerity, nor do I doubt the efficacy of their faith in Jesus Christ.  But I do challenge them on something I’ve had to wrestle with, this “passion” for “Thee, O Lord” can easily be an ego endeavor as it will afford one an opportunity to ensconce himself in a position of power in Christian culture.  But this immediately flies in the face of a fundamental teaching of Jesus—that power is found in powerlessness and the appeal to the power of ego-gratification is intoxicating as, ahem, “hell.”

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“My Soul Followeth Hard After Thee” to A Sad Extreme

My heart goes out to John Allen Chao, the young man who lost his life trying to bring Jesus to the Sentinalese Islanders a few days ago.  He had the passion that I had at his age…and still have today, in some way…captured with the Psalmist who declared, “My soul followeth hard after Thee, O Lord.”  And that is a noble passion which I am glad I have today, though now with the wisdom of four additional decades.

Humankind carries a Divine spark.  And that “spark” is more intense with some men and women exemplified such as Mr. Chao. But that spark needs to be couched in and guided by a spiritual structure which will give it wisdom which would have prevented this tragedy.  Young men and women who are driven by the very noble goal of “winning souls to Jesus” need to be guided by wise men and women who can direct that spiritual passion to realistic, immediate, and personal concerns very much related to the admonishment of the Apostle Paul to, “work out your own salvation, with fear and trembling.”

This young man had the “Spirit of the Lord upon him,” but had not lived long enough to acquire the wisdom to realize that the Grace of God covers us all, even those who are so primitive and “crude” as to not see the world as we do and will respond with violence to those who dare to intrude upon their isolation.  I blame this tragedy upon the structure of some dimensions of the Christian faith who do not have this wisdom, who see their faith…steeped in cognition, i.e. “the letter of the law,…as “factual” rather than spiritual and entitles them to overrule the personal space of those who view the world differently.  People with this kind of missionary zeal are so cognitively oriented that they feel mere reason will be effective in convincing others to see the world as they do, immediately integrating these new teachings into a new perspective of their world.  They see Jesus as a “thing”, that is a mere “idea”, who by means of “ideas” can reach into the heart of others, even those who have never heard of Him.

I’m so sorry for this young man.  But, he can say, as did Martin Luther King, “Free at last.  Free at last.  Praise God, I’m free at last.”  For, he is back where he came from, in the “bosom of Abraham,” in his Source and free of the duress of the Shakespearean, “mortal coil.”

The following is a list of my other blogs.


https://anerrantbaptistpreacher.wordpress.com/

https://literarylew.wordpress.com/

https://theonlytruthinpolitics.wordpress.com/

 

“Perfect Love Casteth Our Fear”

“Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders.  That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for a lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger.  It works the same in any country.  (Hermann Goring, commander of Hitler’s Luftwaffe, aka ‘Air Force’)

I came of age in the 1960’s and remember so clearly the hysteria of “creeping Communism” and the Domino Theory that falsely legitimized our involvement in Viet Nam.  I even owned, and read several times, John A. Stormer’s, “None Dare Call It Treason” which I now recognize as one of the greatest conspiracy-theorist treatises of all time.  But I drank “that kool-aid” at the time and was always looking for more, announcing even…so to speak…”gimme more!  Give it to me straight.  Just gimme the undiluted poison.”  For my fear-based young mind and heart desperately needed to see bogey-men “out there” and readily imbibed any message which would feed this deep-seated paranoia of mine. Related to this hysteria that I was immersed in, I was caught up in a fear-based fundamentalist religion which taught me that “evil” was “out there” and taught me to totally ignore paying attention to how it was firmly entrenched in my own heart…and in the heart of the culture that was teaching me this.  Goring knew that fear was the great motivator and that any tin-horn demagogue could succeed if he offered a steady diet of hysteria that would feed the fear-base of his constituency’s core.

Life is precarious as the “grim reaper” is always near by and will eventually claim us all.  This fear of death is the primal source of all fear, insecurity, and vulnerability and people like those in Hitler’s “cabinet” knew how to exploit this.  Spiritual teachers, such as Jesus, understood this fear and taught that the solution was to confront this fear boldly and “die” before physical death and discover that the “sting of death” could then be abided.  Psychologist Irvin Yalom in recent decades taught this also, noting that only those who had confronted this fear and “died” while yet living could live rather than bide their time beneath a fear-based persona that prevented them from living;  they could then recognize the meaning of Jesus’s famous teaching, “What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world and loses his own soul; or, what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” But political and religious leaders, so often already enslaved by their own fear-based demons, cannot understand this and cannot help but mindlessly proffer a fear-based belief system to people who are susceptible to this enslavement.

I close with a note from Jesus, “Perfect love casteth out fear.”

Simone Weil on the Christian Persona

The “false self” is what the Crucifixion is about.  It is about the persona that we acquire, even the “christian persona” which is the façade that many of us hide behind to keep us from the Jungian shadow that we all fear.  Behind the perfunctory righteousness and platitudes that we have learned, there is abysmal darkness that we refuse to acknowledge, even though simple acknowledgement would free us up to allow the energy of our life-force, i.e. the “Spirit of God,” to flow unimpeded and allow the “enfleshment” which the story of Jesus was about.  Read here how one great Christian Saint of the 20th century put it:

Simone Weil said that we have been given the very gift of our being by God, so everything that comes to us, everything is God’s gift, including our very being. So what can we give God in return, she says. She says what happens, for whatever reason, is that we construct a false self, a false I, a false ego. False because we become attached to it, we defend it, we attribute too much reality to it. We think it’s an end in itself rather than a means, a medium of communication, or a way of service. So the ego begins to predominate in our minds, our feelings, our relationships – in that whole complex business – and that takes years sometimes to unravel. She says the one thing we can give to God is the demolition of this false self, this false I. She uses the word ‘destruction’ which is rather a violent word but sometimes it does feel like destruction. At times when you struggle with your ego, it feels there is a certain interior violence going on. It isn’t really about doing harm to oneself, but there is a real, serious work to do which is at times difficult in the transcendence, or the deconstruction, or the demolition of our false self. And this is the central importance of meditation in the process of finding ourselves.

“Purity and Danger” by anthropologist Mary Douglas explores tribal culture’s and their hyper emphasis of purity and its relationship to “perceived” danger.  The “danger” is usually the fear of contamination  by new ideas from beyond the pale of their culture but also from within the culture as deviance from within is always present within any culture that has any dynamic quality.

The hyper emphasis of purity always belies profound insecurity of the tribe, the fear that its values could not withstand any necessary adjustment from the introduction of the “new” or novel.  When this threat is on the horizon it is common practice to emphasize strongly the importance of the status quo and to demonize any deviance. This was evidenced in our country about a decade ago when the Tea Party sought to “purify” the Republican Party and began to label as RINA (Republican in Name Only) to anyone who took a view deemed to be inconsistent with the party line.

But today my focus is on the “purity and danger” phenomena is in fundamentalist Christianity, expressed in its inordinate emphasis of protecting the virginity of their young girls.  This often includes a ceremony in which the girls father places a purity ring on her finger as she takes a vow of chastity until her marriage.  (This makes me think of a quip by H.L. Mencken, “The problem with chastity is its over emphasis of sex.”) However, victims of this abuse are now beginning to report the trauma they experienced and the suffering they experienced as they began to mature beyond the reaches of their conservative faith and explore their sexuality.  (See the following link for one report:  http://www.foxnews. pcom/lifestyle/2018/09/15/woman-recalls-how-broke-free-evangelical-purity-movement.html) I not here advocating sexual promiscuity or debauchery for anyone, certainly not children.  I am bringing to attention the fear of sexuality that is often present in religion and the gross tragedy  that often results from having denied that dimension of human experience.  Furthermore, my concern with the Christian tradition which provided my spiritual roots is the very much related denial of the whole of the body and its impulses, the fear of losing control as W. H. Auden described in the poem with which I will conclude.

There is “danger” when we fear our body’s impulses and become obsessive with a desire for purity.  This cannot help but create impurity which will find expression somewhere whether it be in our own acting out or “rubbing elbows” with the impurity we fear under the ruse of ministering to them.  Decades ago there was a fundamentalist evangelist who preached loud and hard about immorality and even set up his office on Bourbon Street in New Orleans where he could preach to the prostitutes and strippers.  Eventually he was caught in an alley being serviced by a prostitute.

If…like your father before you, come
Where thought accuses and feeling mocks,
Believe your pain: praise the scorching rocks
For their desiccation of your lust,
Thank the bitter treatment of the tide
For its dissolution of your pride,
That the whirlwind may arrange your will
And the deluge release it to find
The spring in the desert, the fruitful
Island in the sea, where flesh and mind
Are delivered from mistrust.
(W. H. Auden “The Sea and the Mirror)

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Here is a list of my blogs.  I invite you to check out the other two sometime.

https://anerrantbaptistpreacher.wordpress.com/

https://literarylew.wordpress.com/

https://theonlytruthinpolitics.wordpress.com/

Jeff Sessions and His “Religious Liberty Task Force.”

Attorney Jeff Sessions has proposed a, “religious liberty task force.” This makes me think of the war on Christmas, the annual non-sense that some Christians trot out to enhance their sense of piety and alienation. Many evangelical Christians fail to have the self-reflection necessary to realize that they are the source of the, “war on Christmas,” that they are the ones who need to be the focus of any, “religious liberty task force.”  But they are so obsessed with their piety that self-reflectiveness would be a catastrophe, as it would create a, “splinter in the brain” that Emily Dickinson referred to.

I write here in a confessional mode, from personal experience.  I was mired in this “mindless” piety and not willing to initiate the process of, “working out my own salvation with fear and trembling” that the Apostle Paul recommended.  This “fear and trembling” is very much akin to the aforementioned, “splinter in the brain” which is necessary for life to break through the encrusted hypocrisy of an unexamined life.  Fortunately, the good Lord was merciful to me and has meted out this “splintering” over the course of four decades as He knew I could not handle it otherwise.  He knew, graciously, that my hypocrisy was a necessary evil with which I could cover my fragile ego (i.e. “ass”) long enough to muster up enough ego integrity to handle the sting of all those splinters.,

It is painful to wallow in disillusionment.  Someone said that, “Reality is a veil that we spin to hide the void,” and when that veil begins to be pierced by the “thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir too,” disillusionment is inevitable.  Then we lament with T.S. Eliot, “Oh the shame of motives late revealed, and the awareness of things ill done, and done to others harm which once we took for exercise of virtue.”  This always brings to my mind King Lear on the heath of his former kingdom, “pelted by this pitiless storm,” bereft of his family and political power, finding himself naked, noting re roving animals nearby:

Poor naked wretches, whereso’er you are,
That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
Your loop’d and window’d raggedness, defend you
From seasons such as these? O, I have ta’en
Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp;
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,
That thou mayst shake the superflux to them,
And show the heavens more just.

Lear was naked, buck naked, stripped of the superficies of his existence and understanding that in essence he had never been anything more than these, “poor, bare forked creatures.”  Religion is a fine cover-up for this nakedness but according to spiritual teachers, such as Jesus, it is only in this nakedness that we can find redemption.

A Fractured Faith Needs a Fractured Ego

An Irish couple responded to this morning’s post who blog under the title, “Fractured Faith.”  I could not pass that title up, though I’m not for sure yet what they have in mind with their title.  “Fractured faith” will be a theme I will explore as this blog continues to develop as I see faith having value only when it is “fractured,” as the crystalline, letter-of-the-law edifice is shredded by God’s employment of daily experiences that teach us to look at Holy Writ and spiritual tradition differently than the way in which we were taught.  This “fracturing” of our faith will parallel a “fracturing” of our self, of our identity, as we discover just how much our persona was itself just an edifice.  That is what Jesus told the religious establishment of his day, but they did not “take kindly” to his observations…to say the least.  For Jesus, like Shakespeare noted of religious people that often, “With devotions visage and pious action they sugar o’er the devil himself.”

Our certainties must be fractured.  At some point we need to, “live in the collapse what was believed in as most certain and therefore the fittest for renunciation.”  (T.S. Eliot) Translated into spiritual terms, this means that we must realize that our ego has inevitably taken our spiritual tradition and twisted it into a self-serving interpretation, not because we are, “bad” but because we are merely human.  We then realize that we, being human simply “have eyes to see, but see not, ears to hear but hear not.”  We can then begin to realize that at best we will see dimly and hear faintly and begin to lighten up on ourselves and even on others!  We can begin to accept some forgiveness for ourselves and even dare to offer it to others.  Well, maybe not “them”!  They surely deserve it!   Just kidding!!!