Tag Archives: carl jung

“They’re All a Bunch of Damn Hypocrites”!!!

Well, actually I exaggerate…kinda.  Technically I think that describes all of us as we are intrinsically complicated critters and beneath the surface of our lives can be found a myriad of unsavoury thoughts and impulses. But at times one of them bubbles to the surface and wreaks havoc on our lives and even those around us.

Just yesterday a young, vocally anti-gay legislator in Ohio, resigned after having an homo-sexual encounter in his office weeks earlier.  Yes, hypocrisy is on the table but that is not my concern as hypocrisy is common with most of us, especially in the sexual arena.  But in conservative Christian circles it is even more egregiously problematic and subject to severe disapproval.  Four years ago the pastor of a Florida mega-church, whose father was a spiritual mentor of Obama, committed suicide when it came out that he had been abusive of his wife and had been sexually involved with a woman on the staff of his church.  There is not a lot of forgiveness a mega-church context.  Oh, God offers it but he followers have a higher standard of moral excellence than He does.

I actually feel sorry for this young legislator who is now brought face-to-face with an inner haunt of his.  He might not even be gay…though apparently whispers of this issue go back years… but his hetero-sexuality is not as pure has he once thought.  And related to that and the whole gamut of human experience, nothing is as pure as we were taught and maturity requires learning to live with ambivalence and contradiction.  But conservative religion, being intrinsically linear, leaves no room for such vagaries.  And neither does conservative politics.

This issue reflects a threat to conservative expressions of the Christian faith more serious than the bogus annual “war on Christmas.”  This threat is internal, stemming from their historical focus on the surface of life and neglecting the depths of the heart where lies myriad, “beastly little treasures.”  But the treasures will always lay hidden, often beneath the surface of perfunctory Christian charitable behavior, until the beast is acknowledged as Carl Jung encouraged with his emphasis of the shadow in the human soul

Well, actually I exaggerate…kinda.  Technically I think that describes all of us as we are intrinsically complicated critters and beneath the surface of our lives can be found a myriad of unsavoury thoughts and impulses. But at times one of them bubbles to the surface and wreaks havoc on our lives and even those around us.

Just yesterday a young, vocally anti-gay legislator in Ohio, resigned after having an homo-sexual encounter in his office weeks earlier.  Yes, hypocrisy is on the table but that is not my concern as hypocrisy is common with most of us, especially in the sexual arena.  But in conservative Christian circles it is even more egregiously problematic and subject to severe disapproval.  Four years ago the pastor of a Florida mega-church, whose father was a spiritual mentor of Obama, committed suicide when it came out that he had been abusive of his wife and had been sexually involved with a woman on the staff of his church.  There is not a lot of forgiveness a mega-church context.  Oh, God offers it but he followers have a higher standard of moral excellence than He does.

I actually feel sorry for this young legislator who is now brought face-to-face with an inner haunt of his.  He might not even be gay…though apparently whispers of this issue go back years… but his hetero-sexuality is not as pure has he once thought.  And related to that and the whole gamut of human experience, nothing is as pure as we were taught and maturity requires learning to live with ambivalence and contradiction.  But conservative religion, being intrinsically linear, leaves no room for such vagaries.  And neither does conservative politics.

This issue reflects a threat to conservative expressions of the Christian faith more serious than the bogus annual “war on Christmas.”  This threat is internal, stemming from their historical focus on the surface of life and neglecting the depths of the heart where lies myriad, “beastly little treasures.”  But the treasures will always lay hidden, often beneath the surface of perfunctory Christian charitable behavior, until the beast is acknowledged as Carl Jung encouraged with his emphasis of the shadow in the human soul

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An Affirmation of Faith

Increasingly I am emboldened in my faith, finding the courage to allow this experience to extend deeper into my heart and into the whole of my life.  As I do so I feel empowered to speak and write from my heart, realizing that if you speak from any other source you are merely using what Carl Jung called “directed thinking.”  Directed thinking was his term for thinking which is designed to mesh with a social and cultural context, a type of thinking which is very important, but not if it disallows a more genuine, authentic vein of thought.

Often as I “hold forth” here I experience a tinge of guilt as I am approaching faith in a way that is contrary to the way I was taught in my youth, contrary to “the faith once delivered unto the saints.”  But this guilt is a core issue and reflects the residual enslavement to the “guilting into” religion that I was subjected to as a child.  That “guilting into” dimension of faith is not as bad as it sounds as it is merely part of enculturation and a part that can be discarded as we grow up, allowing a more genuine experience.

Another dimension of angst I experience is, “What will they think?”  There are family members and people from my youth who probably have ventured into this literary venture of mine from time to time and they will certainly lament, “Oh, he certainly has ‘departed from the faith once delivered unto the saints’ or perhaps, ‘He went out from us because he was not of us.’”  There is residual guilt for having ventured from the beaten path at this late point in my life.  But, as Jesus put it, “What shall a man profit if he gains the whole world and loses his own soul” which is what happens if we obsessively trek onward on that “beaten” path and never allow authenticity to flow from our lives.  It is the fear that Henry David Thoreau had when he “went to the woods” and there sought to delve into the marrow of life and not come to the end of his life and realize that what he had lived was not life at all.

Still another critical concern I have is the residual notion, “If I’m right, they are wrong.”  In the linear thinking that I was enculturated into, right and wrong are clear and distinct categories so that the vein of spirituality that I share here must mean that those who I have “left behind” don’t have it right.  In that same vein of thinking it would mean that “I’m saved” and “they aren’t” unless they believe as I do.  That is certainly true if one is enslaved to linear thought but not in the least if one has found freedom from that prison.  I now see the Christian story as an expression of cosmic truth, a story of love and grace that has been written into the hearts of mankind from eons past which found one beautiful expression in the person of Jesus Christ.  His story shows us that His Grace is a gift and is not dependent on our “believing right” or even “behaving right” but merely an unconditional absolution for perceived guilt and shame.

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Two other blogs of mine are listed here which I invite you to check out:

https://anerrantbaptistpreacher.wordpress.com/

https://literarylew.wordpress.com/

https://theonlytruthinpolitics.wordpress.com/

A “God-complex” is Avoidance of God

Trump must be one hell of a Christian!  Yes, anyone that free of guilt must be even more than the “baby Christian” that evangelicals say that he is!  In fact, since Trump has never even needed to ask God for forgiveness is the first place, maybe he has always been a Christian…even before he was born perhaps!  In some uncanny way, since the Christian “work of salvation” done in Christ was completed “even before the foundation of the world,” maybe Trump’s roots go back that far and he is god himself!  He certainly acts like it.

And I’ve thought for a long time that Trump does have some “god like” power over people though he would be according to the teachings of Carl Jung, a “dark” god.  For example, many of Trump’s followers have complete faith in him even to the point they support him regardless of what he does or says.  “God” can make no mistake so whatever comes from his mouth, though blatantly false to “non-believers,” is “true” to his followers/believers.  God declares through the prophet Isaiah, “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.  And scriptural literalists interpret this to mean that regardless of what happens, God has dictated it.  This appeared in today’s news when an Oklahoma Republican legislator has declared that abortion should be illegal even in the cases of rape or incest.  “God knows what he is doing, even if we can’t understand it” is the rationale for those believers.

Facetiousness and irony are certainly part of my intent here.  But I have recognized in my clinical work, and in my personal experience, a phenomenon I called “the god complex.”  And persons with this affliction certainly to appear to feel and think they are inviolate like god is, but closer scrutiny reveals that their posture reveals profound insecurity and fear and the certainty they cling to comes only from desperation.  These people have no “faith” in God but only a compulsive, desperate clinging to their thoughts about the Bible and God.  I have found that if they could only “get over themselves” they would find that their faith in the Bible and God could take on a new dimension.  But the price tag is humility and as T.S. Eliot noted, “The only wisdom we can hope to acquire is humility.  And humility is endless.”

 

ADDENDUM—This is one of three blogs that I now have up and running.  Please check the other two out sometime.  The three are: 

https://wordpress.com/posts/anerrantbaptistpreacher.wordpress.com

https://wordpress.com/posts/theonlytruthinpolitics.wordpress.com

https://wordpress.com/posts/literarylew

Congressman Steven King Needs a “Damascus Road” Conversion

Steven King, the arch-conservative Republican Senator from Iowa has given us a classic example of unexamined racism.  And, furthermore, racism in its deepest essence cannot be examined by the racist as it is too deep-seated in the soul as described in the post this morning.  To ask King to see his racism is like asking a fish to see water for it is an essential dimension of his spiritual existence in this world.  Let me employ imagination for a moment and pretend someone can reach into King’s heart, wrap his hand around that racist core, and suddenly yank it out into the light day.  King would melt down immediately.  It kind of reminds me of the Star Wars computer, “Hal” being unplugged against his will and against his stern prohibition.  Immediately Hal began to “melt down,” as his voice faltered and broke until there was silence.  I also have the image of the robots on “West World” being unplugged, watching their face begin to show bewilderment, then their lead slumping to the side lifelessly.

Carl Jung would describe racism in archetypal terms.  It is what happens when one’s soul has been captured by a culturally provided demon and the machinations of that demon have been reinforced for a lifetime by one’s community and culture.  Jung would say that the only way to escape this demon is individuation which he describes as the process of “cutting the cord” with the cultural matrix in which was born and raised.  This does not mean the individuated soul will necessarily leave that culture but he will be released from the infantile grip that the culture has on all of us until we dare to grow up.

Several days ago King declared that Hispanics and Blacks will be fighting each other before they will ever outnumber the whites.  This reflects a core dimension of racism, the inability to see that apparent “opposites” can be united in spite of their superficial differences though only if one is able and willing to get out of his little ego and see, and experience, the unity of all things.  But racism for some is so deep-seated, such an intrinsic dimension of his soul, that to let go of this compulsive distinction-drawing, i.e. “judgment”, would threaten him with the risk of what child psychiatrist Donald Winnicott described as a “psychic catastrophe.”  And by the way, I think that might be a way to describe what happened to the Apostle Paul on the Damascus road.  All of his certainties suddenly were crushed by the light of the day, i.e. “consciousness” and distinctions which previously were absolute were suddenly not so absolute.  I like the Bible’s way of describing it as a visitation from God.

ADDENDUM—This is one of three blogs that I now have up and running.  Please check the other two out sometime.  The three are: 

https://wordpress.com/posts/anerrantbaptistpreacher.wordpress.com

https://wordpress.com/posts/theonlytruthinpolitics.wordpress.com

https://wordpress.com/posts/literarylew.wordpress.com

The Myth of the Wounded Healer.

One of the delights in blogging is that I discover kindred spirits from various parts of the world.  One recent discovery was a blog entitled “Nickle Boy Graphics” in which another man with a fundamentalist-Christian past brings to the table a gentler approach to biblical faith.  He is a talented graphic artist and uses this skill and knowledge of the Christian tradition to kindly and gently chide those Christians who take themselves too seriously.  Here is a link to one of his posts which I found very provocative:  https://nickelboygraphics.wordpress.com/2017/02/24/its-not-about-giving-up-teddy-bears/

One point this gentleman makes here is that we need to always remember that beneath the surface of someone who is careening in life, appearing to be on the verge of crashing and burning, there is a soul in great pain.  It is so easy to offer, from our font of “great wisdom” a banal kindness and reassurance which, though innocently intended perhaps, fails to include simple recognition of this person’s presence in the world, which I like to describe as “Presence.”  Before we unleash our “fixing” machinery on this person…a tendency we professional care-givers always has ready to unleash on the world…we need to pause and offer simple recognition and acceptance.  We need to lay aside our diagnostic knife and merely recognize, “You and I are here together brother/sister.  We are in this together and I accept you ‘as is’.”  It is easier and simpler to wield diagnostic jargon such as “nuts” or perhaps a sanitized “mentally ill,” or “sinner” or “evil” or “alcoholic” or “drug addict.”  Each of these labels might be quite valid but beneath the label that we so readily foist on the person there is a “Person” who needs to be spiritually/emotionally embraced, as in “accepted.”  And this is not unrelated to the “acceptance” that Christians purport to find in Jesus but closer scrutiny of the scripture reveals that Jesus always has in mind acceptance “as is” without the requirements many Christians demand.  When an individual is offered this “as is” acceptance, described by psychologist Carl Rogers as “unconditional positive regard”, often that individual can find the Grace to begin to address the pain that until that point he had been unable to embrace.

The ability to offer this “unconditional positive regard” comes only with having been through the experience of brokenness oneself and having found someone who proffered this kindness.  It is the ego’s refusal to experience “brokenness” that keeps many professional care-givers from becoming the mythical “wounded-healer” who can facilitate the soul-work where healing is realized.  (Carl Jung is the one who first coined the term “wounded-healer,” perhaps drawing upon Greek mythology.)

Blaming Won’t Work!

In the “short version of ‘my story'”  I described the context of my “call to preach.” The blame issue is certainly apropos here and thus merits discussion. But I’m now to the point that I see beyond “blaming” and see the wisdom of accepting responsibility for choices that I made, even “choices” when I was a mere “babe” and not really capable of making any “choice.” We are all born in a context and are shaped by that context and can never fully escape that it. But most of us can get to the point where we have some awareness of that context, and of its impact on our life, and can then make better choices than if we had not gained that awareness.

Blaming accomplishes nothing. It is a ruse that we use to pretend that we are not making choices so that we can perpetuate maladaptive thought-patterns, emotions, and behaviors which long-since needed to be discarded. We have to realize that we hang on to them…hang onto the pain…because of the fear that what we would find in their absence would be greater than the pain we have when they are present. Or, as Shakespeare so pithily put it, “We cling to these ills that we have rather than fly to others that we know not of.” We prefer to cling to discomfort, and even misery, with which we are accustomed than to risk a fate that we “know not of.”

A dear friend of mine once alluded to a very painful situation in his family life and noted a point of acceptance when he allowed “the pain to swim over me.” That image of engulfment has stayed with me for two or more decades as I’ve sought the courage to accept my own “pain body”, using Eckhart Tolle’s term. We hate pain and the core of our being is predicated on avoiding it, even though if we could manage to accept the pain we could live more fully than we have when trying ferociously to avoid it.

This brings me to the image of The Cross and the story of Jesus and the Crucifixion. The teachings of Carl Jung offer a richer interpretation of this story, suggesting to the Crucifixion is a call to the death of the ego, to the surrendering of our pain body and embracing the pain rather than denying it, discovering in the process that we can survive and, even, we find “Resurrection.” It is much simpler to take the story literally and to do so allows the ego to continue to direct our lives and allow us to live in the pious certainty, the tyranny of “the way things are.” We then continue to remain ensconced in the time-space continuum and completely avoid the spiritual realm, even though we may take great pride in “preaching Christ and him crucified” and other hackneyed bromides.