Tag Archives: Pharisees

Why is Stormy Daniels Not More of a Big Story????

The answer is that Trump has introduced a pivotal change in our definition of reality.  He demonstrated even before announcing his campaign last year, that he was the antithesis of our core values, i.e. “Christian values,”…and yet a significant portion of the Christian population lined up behind him and are even now “dug in at the heels” in support of him.  He has made the unacceptable totally acceptable, i.e. use of words like, “cunt,” “pussy,” and now “shit-hole,” and yet those which are the most die-hard “Christians,” (extremist fundamentalists) still fiercely pledge their loyalty to him. Stormy Daniels is much less a breach of Christian virtue than was revealed in Trump’s numerous video recordings of amorous intentions toward his daughter; yet, fundamentalist Christians hardly batted an eye at the allegation, declaring that, “the Lord has raised him up,” and proffered lame excuse like, “Well, the Lord often uses broken vessels,” or, “Who am I to judge?”

It is apparent to most of us that the moral fabric of our country is in jeopardy but many of those of the “spiritual cut” are so ensconced in their self-serving ideology…though it may be “christian,”…that they cannot acknowledge what is going on.  That is because their faith is so specious, a point I make with the recognition that their “salvation” is not dependent on their faith but the object of their faith.  Their only “sin” is failing to recognize that their very grasp of the world is “specious,”…as is mine and yours…and that in the person of Jesus Christ they have been forgiven of that and all of their sins.  But, the hardest part of the deal is that of the Pharisees, recognizing that, “Uh oh.  I got it wrong.”  According to how I read the New Testament, we are not “saved” by virtue of “having it right,” but having acknowledged that we intrinsically, “have it wrong.”  This is merely the result of, “seeing through a glass darkly.”

(See story re Stormy Daniels—http://www.cnn.com/2018/01/19/politics/stormy-daniels-analysis/index.html)

 

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Richard Rohr Prophecy, Part 3

Christians are usually sincere and well-intentioned people until you get to any issues of ego, control, power, money, pleasure, and security.  Then they tend to be like everyone else.  We often give only a bogus version of the gospel, a fast-food religion, without any deep transformation of the self; and the result has been the spiritual disaster of Christian countries that tend to be so consumer-oriented, proud, warlike, racist, class conscious, and addictive as everybody else and often even more so, I’m afraid.  (Richard Rohr, posted in “Mindful Christianity” on Facebook.)

Here Rohr alludes to addiction that often besets Christian countries, making people in these countries, “tend to be like everyone else.”  His teachings emphasize the addictive dimension of faith, a malady that leads him to encourage meditation as part of spiritual practice. He sees meditation as a means by which one can quieten that “monkey mind” that is often present in all spiritual practice, leaving one’s quest for spiritual depth to consist largely of a lot of thoughts bouncing around in one’s skull.  The core issue is addiction to thinking and even if “spirituality” characterizes one’s thinking it does not mean that this “rhapsody of words” (Shakespeare)  is anything but rhetoric disguised as spiritual truth

Rhetorical spiritual truth, i.e. “the letter of the law,” is upon closer scrutiny merely a means of avoiding the spiritual truth that is hidden in the literal grasp of the holy writ.  Meditation facilitates the opening of space between the rhetoric and the Essential, allowing that Essential dimension to begin seeping through into our consciousness and therefore into our day to day life.  It “quietens the mind” and allows that “still small voice of God” to filter through a lifetime of accumulated cognitive detritus. However, when one is addicted to his “cognitive detritus” and it happens to have the label “spiritual,” it is very challenging to understand and admit that it is merely detritus, an obsession with the superficial dimension of teachings without allowing experience of the Essential meaning.  This is the circumstance Jesus discovered in his life time with the religious establishment, leading him to say some rather “uncharitable” things to the Pharisees because he realized that they were so often merely, “straining at a gnat, and swallowing a camel.”

Another dimension of this problem is addressed in the Eastern teaching, “the word is not the thing,” succinctly captured with the Buddhist observation, “The finger pointing to the moon is not the moon.”  Just because we use words like, “God” or “Holy Spirit” or “the Bible” etc. does not mean they have any real value other than that of the aforementioned detritus.  These words are mere “pointers” and their value is found when we allow them to lead us into the Essential dimension.  French philosopher Gabriel Marcel, a devoted Christian, recognized this when he noted, “Words have value when they ‘open up’ into a region beyond themselves.” When the word is but a thing, it is only an object and is not allowed to open up.  This closely parallels the dilemma of “letter of the law” believers who are unable to “open up” as they take even themselves literally, not recognizing that they are but an expression of a mysterious and ineffable presence.  Their bondage to the “letter of the law” reveals the bondage of their life, a bondage that spiritual teachings seek to free them from.  But for this truth to begin sinking through to them they would have to admit, “I have eyes to see, but see not; ears to hear, but hear not.”

A Doff of My Hat to Karl Marx!

I’m back, after a long hiatus.  The “Get a Life Gods” intervened and made me deal with reality for a bit but I’ve done penance and now am free to frivolously self-indulge with blogging again!  And what could be more frivolous than to “hold forth” about religion!

The escapism of religion becomes more apparent to me almost daily even as my faith deepens; and the “deepening” is taking place sincerely and with some semblance of intellectual and emotional integrity.  I hope!!!  It helps me to understand that Karl Marx was right, religion is the opiate of the masses and being part of the mass…as is the case with us all…I must take my daily hit, no?  I’m not being completely facetious here as I do believe there is an opiate dimension to faith and acknowledgement of this actually gives me comfort.  Failing to appreciate the “opiate dimension” of faith leaves one with the ego-pursuit of blind escapism in some neurotic or even psychotic desire to escape reality which I don’t think spiritual teachers like Jesus had in mind.  I think Jesus knew that, “The Spirit is willing but the flesh is weak,” and that we need moments when we indulge with the comfort of a platitude or banality.  If we have any humility remaining in our spirituality we can accept this.  But most of my experience with my Christian faith has not allowed any such humility and I don’t think it was only myself who has been, and is, plagued with this spiritual arrogance.

In spiritual culture…and spirituality is a culture in some sense…there is an emphasis on “getting it right” and “breaking on through to the other side” or even having “the real McCoy” compared with those spiritual plebeians who are wasting their time in the “shallow waters.”  But this attitude is the essence of the Pharisaism that Jesus took umbrage against.  If God blesses us with an occasional dollop of humility…or if our arrogance can abate a moment to receive it…we can meekly accept the grace of a simple platitude or banality and perhaps be less condemning of those who live there