Tag Archives: richard rohr

Richard Rohr Prophecy, Part 3

Christians are usually sincere and well-intentioned people until you get to any issues of ego, control, power, money, pleasure, and security.  Then they tend to be like everyone else.  We often give only a bogus version of the gospel, a fast-food religion, without any deep transformation of the self; and the result has been the spiritual disaster of Christian countries that tend to be so consumer-oriented, proud, warlike, racist, class conscious, and addictive as everybody else and often even more so, I’m afraid.  (Richard Rohr, posted in “Mindful Christianity” on Facebook.)

Here Rohr alludes to addiction that often besets Christian countries, making people in these countries, “tend to be like everyone else.”  His teachings emphasize the addictive dimension of faith, a malady that leads him to encourage meditation as part of spiritual practice. He sees meditation as a means by which one can quieten that “monkey mind” that is often present in all spiritual practice, leaving one’s quest for spiritual depth to consist largely of a lot of thoughts bouncing around in one’s skull.  The core issue is addiction to thinking and even if “spirituality” characterizes one’s thinking it does not mean that this “rhapsody of words” (Shakespeare)  is anything but rhetoric disguised as spiritual truth

Rhetorical spiritual truth, i.e. “the letter of the law,” is upon closer scrutiny merely a means of avoiding the spiritual truth that is hidden in the literal grasp of the holy writ.  Meditation facilitates the opening of space between the rhetoric and the Essential, allowing that Essential dimension to begin seeping through into our consciousness and therefore into our day to day life.  It “quietens the mind” and allows that “still small voice of God” to filter through a lifetime of accumulated cognitive detritus. However, when one is addicted to his “cognitive detritus” and it happens to have the label “spiritual,” it is very challenging to understand and admit that it is merely detritus, an obsession with the superficial dimension of teachings without allowing experience of the Essential meaning.  This is the circumstance Jesus discovered in his life time with the religious establishment, leading him to say some rather “uncharitable” things to the Pharisees because he realized that they were so often merely, “straining at a gnat, and swallowing a camel.”

Another dimension of this problem is addressed in the Eastern teaching, “the word is not the thing,” succinctly captured with the Buddhist observation, “The finger pointing to the moon is not the moon.”  Just because we use words like, “God” or “Holy Spirit” or “the Bible” etc. does not mean they have any real value other than that of the aforementioned detritus.  These words are mere “pointers” and their value is found when we allow them to lead us into the Essential dimension.  French philosopher Gabriel Marcel, a devoted Christian, recognized this when he noted, “Words have value when they ‘open up’ into a region beyond themselves.” When the word is but a thing, it is only an object and is not allowed to open up.  This closely parallels the dilemma of “letter of the law” believers who are unable to “open up” as they take even themselves literally, not recognizing that they are but an expression of a mysterious and ineffable presence.  Their bondage to the “letter of the law” reveals the bondage of their life, a bondage that spiritual teachings seek to free them from.  But for this truth to begin sinking through to them they would have to admit, “I have eyes to see, but see not; ears to hear, but hear not.”

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Richard Rohr Prophecies, Part 2

Christians are usually sincere and well-intentioned people until you get to any issues of ego, control, power, money, pleasure, and security.  Then they tend to be like everyone else.  We often give only a bogus version of the gospel, a fast-food religion, without any deep transformation of the self; and the result has been the spiritual disaster of Christian countries that tend to be so consumer-oriented, proud, warlike, racist, class conscious, and addictive as everybody else and often even more so, I’m afraid.  (Richard Rohr, posted in “Mindful Christianity” on Facebook.)

I do think that most Christians are “well-intentioned,” even those who I fiercely disagree with.  But speaking from what I have seen and from my own personal experience, the influence of human needs for, “ego (gratification), control, power, money, pleasure, and security” play a greater role in faith than it is comfortable to acknowledge.  Each of these needs can be subsumed under the rubric “ego” which is the Pauline “flesh” in modern terms.  As a result of this we turn out faith into an ego enterprise and even though our announced purpose with our faith is often very noble, the ego is at work getting its “pound of flesh” so that the effectiveness of our noble impulses is diminished…or even obliterated.  I quoted W. Ian Thomas recently who noted that often our spirituality can be merely a stage upon which the ego can strut itself, merely “a platform on which to display our carnal abilities.”

This is not to suggest that anyone’s motives are pure.  Many “noble pursuits” which I am here putting into question accomplish a lot of good.  If one waits until he is “pure” then he will have to wait until he has returned to Eternity!  But a willingness to look at our motives from time to time can help us identify the ego’s machinations and chip away at its tyranny.  However, this insight is painful as often we see just our foolish and self-promoting we have been and often that this has been our primary purpose.  The result can be disillusionment, and disillusionment can be gut-wrenchingly painful and often will lead us to distraction at the first sign of being threatened with it.

Rohr noted also that when we succumb to this ego-tyranny, “we become just like everyone else” as culture, i.e. “the world,” is built upon ego and this is necessary in a sense.  But when we have “become just like everyone else” we are driven by the same whims and fancies of self-gratification those pose the grievous situation we see in the world on this Christmas day.  But a caveat is in order. Being something other than “just like everyone else” is a perilous notion as many in my spiritual tradition, reading Paul’s admonishment to, “Come out from them and be ye separate” do so with foolishness, and sometimes pure insanity, and thus accomplishing “difference.”  But Rohr’s teachings, and those of the Apostle Paul, had to do with where our heart is rooted and the spiritual call in most all religions is to be rooted the Ineffable, not the ephemeral that keeps the world going. Often a specious spirituality will drive one to the extremes which present with us the Alabama spiritual lunacy.

Fr. Richard Rohr Offers a Prophetic Word to Christians.

Christians are usually sincere and well-intentioned people until you get to any issues of ego, control, power, money, pleasure, and security.  Then they tend to be like everyone else.  We often give only a bogus version of the gospel, a fast-food religion, without any deep transformation of the self; and the result has been the spiritual disaster of Christian countries that tend to be so consumer-oriented, proud, warlike, racist, class conscious, and addictive as everybody else and often even more so, I’m afraid.  (Richard Rohr, posted in “Mindful Christianity” on Facebook.)

I intend to use this astute wisdom of Fr. Richard Rohr for a series of posts as here he eloquently notes concerns I have about the Christian faith, concerns which are relevant to me personally.  Here Rohr elucidates how “the flesh” (the Apostle Paul’s term) is very present in our Christian faith, an awareness which that antithesis of our faith (i.e. Satan!!!) does not want us to be aware.  “Awareness” is a powerful antidote to the ego’s machinations which is why we resist it so intently, even to the point of wrapping the teachings of Jesus around our self-serving orientation to life so that we can never let the light of day shine upon them.  I have a hunch that Paul’s “besetting sin” was his recognition of this quandary, the deep-seated, intuitive understanding that, though the “Spirit is willing, the flesh is weak.”  Human frailty is so pronounced that each of us attempts to hide from it, even to the point of taking spiritual teachings like those of Jesus and turning them into “a platform for the display of our carnal abilities.” (W. Ian Thomas) The very human need for a persona will often seize upon spiritual tradition and incorporate it into its complicated and deep-seated (i.e. unconscious) scheme to hide from our frailty, even though it is only in our frailty that we discover God and therefore our self.  This is what Jesus had in mind when he noted, “He that will find himself must lose himself.” (my paraphrasing of Matthew 10:39) and the “self” here that must be lost often includes the Christian persona that we have clung to the whole of our lives.

This issue is very relevant to the Christian voice of today when so many critics, from within and without of Christianity, are warning that the tradition is in jeopardy.  This is because religious leaders have not heard the same prophetic voice that Rohr listens to and have succumbed to the siren call of what Rohr termed “fast-food religion,” alluded to by Dietrich Bonhoeffer as “cheap grace” and by, Vance Havner, an early 20th century fundamentalist evangelist as a, “cheap and easy believism.”  Now the Christ I believe in is not in jeopardy and cannot be, for He is the “Cosmic Christ” that Rohr elsewhere describes, being beyond the grasp of the time/space continuum.  But Christian tradition, sustained by rote ideology is a “house build upon sand” and thus not a reliable object of faith.

 

Here are two other blogs that I publish.

https://anerrantbaptistpreacher.wordpress.com/

https://literarylew.wordpress.com/

https://theonlytruthinpolitics.wordpress.com/

Guilting into Faith

I am “errant” in so many ways other than balking at following through with a career as a preacher. This “errant” theme has characterized the whole of my life though often it was so subtle that I didn’t notice it. For example, I am very much a Christian today but I am not the “right” kind, as defined as what a Christian was in my youth. And for this I feel a lot of guilt for I know that I’m one of those who has “departed from the faith once delivered unto the saints” or who “went out from us because he was not of us.” Guilt, and its kissing-cousin shame, are so fundamental to human nature and are so instrumental in bringing us into the tribe in our youth. And I think that constitutionally I was more susceptible to the torments of those emotions than some are and thus there was a desperation in my effort to “belong” and subscribe to every facet of my conservative culture.

Being a Christian in my youth was a very rational matter; it meant following a simple line of syllogistic reasoning which, having uttered the magic words…the verbal “formula”…one could know the he was “saved” because he had uttered those “magic words.” That never worked for me, not in the depths of my heart, though I assumed for decades that it had as I blindly followed the reasoning of my pastors, “If the Bible says its so, it is so. Trust the Bible, not your feelings.”  And I now see that I was actually being taught to trust reason.

To make a long story short, I see God, the Bible, and the Christian faith as something wholly different. It was best summed up by Richard Rohr recently on Super Soul Sunday when he noted that God “is not a being among other beings, but is the very Ground of Being.” God is not merely another object in our world of objects, though we may believe him to be a very “big” and “powerful” one who lives “far away.” Those qualities still leave him as a “being among other beings” or “an object among other objects.” I now see, and intuitive feel/know Him in the depths of my heart and no longer try to “reason” my way into confidence in Him.

Unfortunately, any traditional Christian reading this, including anyone from my youth who happened to stumble upon this, would immediately say, “Why heck! Doggone it, he fooled around and went atheist on us!” Well, I see what they mean and in their approach to the world they would be right. But I am not an atheist but a man of an increasingly deep faith in God who is the Wholly Other yet inexplicably dwells in me and the rest of us and is working his cosmic Mystery through our meager efforts.